Tutankhamun’s dagger is not the only object made from meteorite

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Researchers who analyzed metal composition of the Tutankhamun’s dagger say it ‘strongly suggests an extraterrestrial origin’. But this is not the only artifact with celestial origins.

The composition of iron used in Tutankhamun’s dagger, is nickel and cobalt, which is commonly found in meteorites. Although people have worked with copper, bronze and gold since 4,000BC, ironwork came much later, and was rare in ancient Egypt. In 2013, nine blackened iron beads, excavated from a cemetery near the Nile in northern Egypt, were found to have been beaten out of meteorite fragments, and also a nickel-iron alloy. The beads are far older than the young pharaoh, dating to 3,200BC.

This means that ancient Egyptians known that these “stones from the sky” had metal in them and the researchers even suggest that meteoric iron may have been very important in Egyptian culture and religion.

Forged from fragments of the prehistoric Gibeon meteorite, Tentetsuou is a katana forged by swordsmith Yoshindo Yoshiwara. The Chiba Institute of Technology—where it is on display—writes, “…the Sword of Heaven truly symbolizes the relationship between human technology and space.”

Forged from fragments of the prehistoric Gibeon meteorite, Tentetsuou is a katana forged by swordsmith Yoshindo Yoshiwara. The Chiba Institute of Technology—where it is on display—writes, “…the Sword of Heaven truly symbolizes the relationship between human technology and space.”

But this worship to meteorites is not found only in Egypt, they have long fascinated humanity. But what is even more interesting is that many times they were used to forge special objects.

The same kind of the iron structure was discovered in two Chinese blades from 1000 BC, and in Native American iron beads from the Hopewell burial mounds in Illinois from 400 BC. Also prehistoric Eskimos mined giant space rocks to make tools and weapons.

Given to him by a loyal tax collector, Mughal Emperor Jahangir had a meteorite forged into a pair of swords and this dagger. Like his Empire, he saw it as a gift from God.

Knife-made-for-Jahangir-partially-of-meteoric-iron

 

One of the must famous and revered meteorite on earth is Mecca’s Black Stone. The stone was venerated at the Kaaba in pre-Islamic pagan times, and according to Muslim tradition, dates back to the time of Adam and Eve.

Why did the ancients, all over the world, felt so fascinated by meteorites? And why did they made special objects with such unusually and hard-to-work-with material? Were these objects made by humans?

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